The meddling US government and its criminal agents…

You may or may not wonder how much longer it will take for the majority of the mostly ignorant American populace to STOP accepting (AND championing) this corrupted, criminal enterprise, they happen to call ‘their’ government. This warmongering, murderous, pedophilia entity that presides over what has become a declining, massively unequal and divided nation. (If ever there was a once great nation, that is now a burgeoning shit hole, the US is certainly headed in that direction)

Amazingly as it seems, the majority of voters are STILL nothing but ideological statists who for whatever illogical reasons, cling to their useless, worthless party values. Be-it the scumbag democrats or the scumbag republicans. And make NO mistake those values are complete fucking garbage. The complete absence of any morals or ethics is beyond clear, yet…the muppetry continues.

Advertisements

Myth 6: Tread Patterns Don’t Matter on the Road

“The shoulders of the tires are important for cornering traction.”

(this is what moto racers and riders refer to as ‘edge grip’ availability and performance)

Off The Beaten Path

To celebrate 15 years of Bicycle Quarterly, we are examining 12 myths in cycling – things that we (and most others) used to believe, but which we have found to be not true. Today, let’s look at tire tread.

“Bicycles don’t hydroplane,” declared some experts many years ago. “Hence, tire tread patterns don’t matter on the road.” The first part is true – even wide bicycle tires are too narrow to lose traction due to hydroplaning – but the conclusion assumes that tread pattern only serves to evacuate water from the tire/road interface.

The reality is more complex. I once cycled on the polished stone that surrounded a college library, and I was surprised by the lack of grip: I crashed. Even though I was unhurt, I learned the hard way that the coefficient of friction between our tires and the rocks that make up the road surface isn’t…

View original post 871 more words

Corbett Report for February 18th

A short 10 minute clip from James Corbett. Even if you just watch the first minute, that would be enough to understand what I deem the “shithole” that I live in. (shithole referring to MY definition of what this country has come to stand for: a nefarious, subversive and tyrannical corporatist-run government)

It’s not the so much the people of this nation, it’s the tyrants who run it. BUT, at the same time the majority of the people have and continue to support (think party ideologues) criminals, pedophiles and warmongering murderers. So, to a point, I have much disdain for what my once beloved country has descended into.

 

Myth 4: Stiffer Frames Are Faster

“…On the flexible bike, pedaling faster didn’t seem as hard. We were out of breath, but our legs didn’t hurt. Once we got in sync with the frame, its response to our pedal strokes felt like a boat rising out of the water, going faster with only a little extra energy input. “You mean, it ‘planes’,”-

Off The Beaten Path

To celebrate 15 years of Bicycle Quarterly, we are examining 12 myths in cycling – things we (and most others) used to believe, but which we have found to be not true. Today, we’ll look at frame stiffness.

When we started Bicycle Quarterly, the thinking about frame stiffness fell into two camps. The majority of cyclists subscribed to the notion that frame flex wastes energy and that stiffer frames are faster. A few scientific types believed that the energy lost to frame flex was small, and thus frame stiffness probably does not matter. There were a few builders, like Bill Davidson, who extolled the ‘lively ride’ of lightweight tubes, but they were mostly ignored.

At Bicycle Quarterly, we mostly subscribed to the notion that it didn’t matter. And so we were happy riding relatively flexible frames… Sure, stiffer frames might offer marginally better performance, but seeing…

View original post 1,082 more words