How Wide is Right for Me?

“Let’s first talk about some fundamentals: Wider tires don’t roll slower than narrow ones. Bicycle Quarterly‘s latest tire tests, published in the Winter 2016 issue (BQ 58), have shown this once again: In a real-road scenario, even 54 mm tires don’t roll slower than 32 mm – or any size in between.”

Off The Beaten Path

open_corner

Our ideas of what is a performance bike have changed a lot in recent years! One of the most exciting bikes of the moment is the Open U.P. – a carbon race bike that accepts 50 mm-wide tires!

Not too long ago, every performance road bike had 700C x 23 mm tires. Now you have to choose not just how wide you want your tires to be, but – thanks to disc brakes – even which wheel size you want to use! For the Bicycle Quarterly test, we rode the Open with 650B x 48 mm tires, but our second tester, Nate King, raced his Open with 700C x 44 mm tires. Which is better? Or should you get several wheelsets for different courses? Is there a reason to switch tires and wheels on the same bike?

tire_test

Let’s first talk about some fundamentals: Wider tires don’t roll slower than narrow ones. Bicycle…

View original post 1,567 more words

Advertisements

A knobby faster than a road tire?

Interesting…very interesting mein herr

Off The Beaten Path

At Compass, we see little point in replicating what you already can buy from others. When we made our first knobby tires, we wanted true dual-purpose tires. Could the new knobbies match the on-pavement of good road tires, yet grip as well in mud as true cyclocross tires. Impossible? You’ll never find out unless you try…

After a few seasons of cyclocross, there is no doubt that the Compass Steilacoom (700C x 38 mm) and Pumpkin Ridge (650B x 42 mm) offer plenty of grip and shed mud well – as you’d expect from their widely spaced knobs.

How about their on-pavement performance? I’ll let others speak on that. Matt Surch, the well-known Canadian gravel racer, wrote: “I don’t understand how the tread rolls so fast and quiet… these are wild!”

When BQ tester Mark tried them, he wrote: “Once the wind drowned out the tire roar at high speed…

View original post 276 more words

Joe Bastardi On Water Vapour & El Ninos

NOT A LOT OF PEOPLE KNOW THAT

By Paul Homewood

Joe Bastardi develops the his ideas on how oceans affect global temperatures, in a guest post at Climate Change Dispatch:

image

Given it’s the number one greenhouse gas (GHG), one would naturally think water vapor (WV) is the big powerhouse in global weather and climate.

It’s why I am a lone voice in the wilderness who supports Dr. John Cahir’s idea from year’s ago that the real metric to measure global warming is saturation mixing ratios.

Unfortunately, such an idea is about as popular as an outbreak of influenza with so many scientists pushing CO2-driven warming.

Why? Well, what is the number one source of thermal energy on the planet, with 99.9%? The oceans. What is the prime source of water vapor (and arguably CO2)? The oceans.

The recent Super El Nino sent an immense amount of water vapor into the pattern. I have already opined that this…

View original post 419 more words

Myth 7: Tubeless Tires Roll Faster

“A tire set up tubeless won’t be faster than a lightweight inner tube, but also not significantly slower. The simple fact is that a tube, especially a lightweight one, is extremely supple and adds very little resistance. The sealant required to run a supple tire tubeless will cancel out the gains from eliminating the tube.”

Off The Beaten Path

When tubeless tires first became popular on mountain bikes, it was their resistance to pinch flats (above) that made them popular. Off-road, there are few nails or broken bottles that can cause punctures (and even those usually will be pushed into the soft ground rather than puncture the tire), but rims can bottom out on sharp rocks and other obstacles. So much so, in fact, that top mountain bike racers used to race on tubular tires – because tubular rims make pinch flats less likely. Eliminating tubes did the same, and while you still could ‘burp’ the tire, in general, tubeless allowed running lower pressures with fewer problems.

Many also believed that tubeless tires were faster. It made sense: an inner tube, even a thin one, added a membrane that flexed and absorbed energy. A tire without a tube had to be faster, even if only by a small amount! One big…

View original post 830 more words